NEWS

Hello Sucker Fans and Friends!

We are hard at work on volume 2 of our literary journal, working through our copyedits as the new year approaches. We anticipate that this volume will be published in March 2013, available in both print and digital versions. It’s been a long journey to find these 9 suckerlicious short stories—we had hundreds of submissions, including an additional Open Door Day on October 1 that brought us another 50 or so. Now that we have found these suckerlicious delights, we are dying to share them with you all and are very excited and proud to publish such amazing work. Continue reading

NEW LOOK

While we get volume 2 of Sucker Literary together, I figured it was time to get a new look, (try) to establish a brand, if you will. Our signature lollipop is now incorporated into the new look. We are trying to work on a logo right now, too. For now, take a look-see at some of the ideas for our logo below…and look around at the site. We are, as always, a work-in-progress! Continue reading

DECISIONS: Open Door Day 2012

FIRST, A THANK YOU

First, an enormous suckerlicious “thank you” to the best staff of readers an editor could ask for. Open Door Day readers included: Joey Lee (special consultant to Sucker), Miranda Cain (copy editor/reader), Molly Cavanaugh (copy editor/reader), Kathleen Ingraham (editorial assistant), Susan Zall (reader), Heather Talty (reader), and Shannon Alexander (reader). These folks are talented writers in their own right and exquisitely insightful critical readers. Without their responses to the stories, I would never have had the courage to listen to my inner voice that cried YAY or NAY to a piece. Validation from them was priceless. Thank you all a million times over. Continue reading

Fear & Expectations

*This blog was recently published on our founder’s blog. Here it is in its entirety.
PART I
A High Bar
When I started Sucker a little over a year ago, I had zero expectations and a glowing vision of what I wanted to do: Publish the best in edgy, emerging YA literary fiction and provide all submitters with feedback that would not crush their hearts. Creating a supportive environment, even among those we had to reject, was tantamount to the desire to publish stellar YA fiction. Continue reading